Ladywriter

Stephen King-dom

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Alas, it has been over a year since my beloved Dark Tower series has ended.

This forum just don't look right without Stephen King leading the parade and so this thread is and always will be dedicated to the works of and news about our dinh Stephen King.

Long days Sai King


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http://www.ew.com/ew/article/commentary/0,6115,1100673_3_0_,00.html

Stephen King issues a challenge to ''Lost'' execs: End the show when you've told the story — even if ratings are still strong by Stephen King

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CREATIVE FIRE King worries Matthew Fox (left) and Terry O'Quinn may one day be ''Lost'' for economic rather than creative reasons

Maybe one reason this summer's movie offerings looked so cheesy was that they came after a particularly brilliant TV season, starring (but certainly not limited to) Desperate Housewives, 24, The Wire, The Shield, and Lost.

Ah, Lost. There's never been anything like it on TV for capturing the imagination, except The Twilight Zone and The X-Files. The series may have at first seemed a rough fictional equivalent of Survivor, but Lost parted company from such wheezy rituals as Tribal Councils almost immediately, and there are no immunity challenges (I think the guy who got sucked into the jet engine in episode 1 proved that resoundingly).

The plot is dead simple — 48 plane-crash survivors stranded on a tropical island — but the production values are grade-A and the characters are involving. Lost projects a sense of genuine awe and mystery, making it most unusual in a medium more known for boredom and predictability.

There's a lot riding on the second season, and I'm not talking about whether the folks who left on the raft will return (they will), whether Kate will sleep with Jack (she won't), or if Charlie will sample the heroin Locke and Boone found (of course he will). What's really on the table here is no less than the soul of what I think of as ''the new TV.''

The perfect critique of the old TV is offered in Rob Reiner's Stand By Me. Gordie Lachance asks his buds if they've ever noticed that the people on Wagon Train (an old '50s show) never seem to get anywhere. ''They just keep wagon-training,'' he says, clearly mystified. Of course he is. Gordie's going to grow up to be a writer, and even at age 12 he knows that stories should resemble life, and life has a beginning, a middle, and an end. We grow, change, succeed, and fail; eventually we keel over dead, but we do not just keep on wagon-training.

All of the shows I've mentioned above acknowledge this fact. But they all also face a huge problem, a.k.a. the Prime Network Directive: Thou Shalt Not Kill the Cash Cow.

That directive is what made the final seasons of The X-Files so ignominious. There was no real closure (as opposed to The Fugitive, for example, when Dr. Richard Kimble finally caught up with the one-armed man in the show's superb two-part conclusion); minus the continuing presence of David Duchovny, X-Files blundered off into a swamp of black oil, and in that swamp it died. I could have throttled the executives at Fox for doing that, and Chris Carter for letting it happen. If J.J. Abrams, Damon Lindelof, and their band of co-conspirators allow something similar to happen with Lost, I'm going to be even more pissed, because this show is better. Memo to Abrams and staff writers: Your responsibilities include knowing when to write The End.

The setting of Lost is exotic; I'm sure almost every viewer has harbored the thought that he or she would like to be one of these castaways (especially since the supply of totally dope resort clothes seems endless). The character pool is plentiful; we had 13 major characters at the end of last season, and there are over 30 more survivors to draw from. And there are fascinating questions. What's the beast? What's up with that polar bear? What's that ship doing on the island? Who are ''The Others'' and where are they hiding? Where does the shaft below the hatch go? These coincidences, which are more like convergences, have led me to agree with the popular Internet chat-room solution, i.e., that the survivors are actually dead, and that the island is their purgatory, a place where they can put paid to sins of omission and commission before going on.

The creators themselves may not know why the numbers on Hurley's winning lottery ticket are replicated on the side of the hatch, or the significance of the polar bear in the comic book 9-year-old Walt was reading shortly before Sawyer shot a real one on the llano, but who cares? The chief attributes of creators are faith and arrogance: faith that there is a solution, and the arrogance to believe they are exactly the right people to find it. The hard part will be telling ABC that Lost is going to conclude with season 3 or season 4, while the audience is still crazy about the show.

ABC parent Disney, of course, will scream bloody murder. To call Lost (like Desperate Housewives) a cash cow is an understatement. We're talking about millions here, and if the show runs long enough, potentially hundreds of millions in DVDs and more.

None of that changes the basic facts: When a meal is perfectly cooked, it's time to take it out of the oven. And when a story is perfectly told, it's time to fade to black. It doesn't matter to me if Jack, Kate, and the others realize they're all dead and descend that shaft into a bright white Kübler-Ross beam of light or if they go to war with each other in a final burst of Lord of the Flies savagery. They can discover they're part of an experiment (human or alien). Jack can even — groan! —wake up and discover the whole thing's a dream (actually, I'd hate that).

But please, guys — don't beat this sweet cow to death with years of ponderous flashback padding. End it any way you want, but when it's time for closure, provide it. Don't just keep on wagon-training.

:happy:

Hell yeah!!!!!


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i wonder if desperation is still going to air in may. and has anyone heard anything new about the "IT" remake?

May 2006 and

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0414919/

King's name aint on this turd :look:


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The Dark Tower will be out in paperback Nov 1st

I'm still looking for dates for the Mass Market Paperback releases of the last 3 books.


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Could be interisting eh?

King's possible collaboration with Marvel:

Marvel Comics' Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada had this to say when a fan noted that novelist Stephen King had said in a web interview he'd be doing some work for Marvel.

"Let's say, hypothetically, that we were doing business with Steven King. Would that be cool?" The crowd responded enthusiastically "Yes" and Quesada replies "Let's leave it at that, then."

Thanks to Ari.

http://www.liljas-library.com/


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I wonder if it would be something toyaly new and original or if he would do a story for already existing characters?

Either way, I think him stepping into comix is a good thing. Get away from just the written word or (most of the time horrible) movie adaptations and try a new medium. One step closer to a cg dt :P

and before anyone can go crazy about the Starbucks coffee shop in Denver 1980 King has said...

“The review of The Colorado Kid in today’s issue of USA Today mentions that there was no Starbucks in Denver in 1980. Don’t assume that’s a mistake on my part. The constant readers of the Dark Tower series may realize that that is not necessarily a continuity error, but a clue.”


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Okay, here's a question for ya:

Should I read The Regulators or Desperation? Speaking of Desperation, I just realized i bought a second copy in hard cover X'D


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Read Desperation first! those two books are like an alternate reality of each other involving the same characters (with switched up names and personalities) and evilness. Desperation is a far superior book and you wouldn't want to read the regulators first or you would have those characters screwed up in your head.

btw, do you have the regulators in hard back too? if you lay the books down and put them next to each other, their covers will form one image. :P


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I liked Desperation better. It has a isolated setting and that sort of thing makes a story more frightning to me where as Regulators is set in suburbia.


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Nightmares and Dreamscapes is being made into eight one-hour episodes for TNT

The production will be filmed by Coote-Hayes Productions (they also did 'Salems Lot)


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"RF" are the initials for many of the incarnations of an ongoing evil being in many stephen king books. Randall Flagg from (The Stand), Richard Fry (The Stand), Flagg the hooded (Eye of the Dragon), Richard Fannin (Dark Tower 4), etc. etc.

He often is associated with a pig, "We are Legion, one of many." and if you think about its reference, legion is of one demon, split into many incarnations/beings. thus legion, tho seperate creatures with slightly different names, all derived of the same evil, plauge king's books with those initials RF.

I highly suggest watching "Storm of the Century" helluva a good movie/mini series, 6 hours long I think? but yeah, it covers the whole Legion thing in that.

heres a good quote:

The Gunslinger (Revised Edition) Page 226:You are my climax.” He tittered. “You see, someone has taken you seriously.” “And this Stranger, does he have a name?” “O, he is named.” “And what is his name?” “Legion,” the man in black said softly, and somewhere in the easterly darkness where the mountains lay, a rockslide punctuated his words and a puma screamed like a woman.

I liked Desperation better. It has a isolated setting and that sort of thing makes a story more frightning to me where as Regulators is set in suburbia.

wentworth, ohio. X'D i think i've been there before. :P

Nightmares and Dreamscapes is being made into eight one-hour episodes for TNT

The production will be filmed by Coote-Hayes Productions (they also did 'Salems Lot)

sweet. :happy:


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Yeah, I knew the whole legion thing, and I knew he used those initials in a bunch of places...I was just wondering if there was a reason for RF in particular. Like, why not JM, or AH?


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oh, lmao.. i looked too much into your question. X'D umm.. i don't think he ever stated any significance to the initials RF unless it was in an interview.


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just one of those characters that get stuck in yer head :P


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...dhin Stephen King.

Long days Sai King

:x You are a Tower Junkie and you misspelled DINH?!?! How could you? Roland would shoot ya for it!:P Kidding, just find it funny that you did it.

I just bought the hardback edition of The Dark Tower, and will commence to reading it tommorrow after work. Looking forward to it.


"There's no such thing as can't. You always have a choice."--Ken Gor, Ying hung boon sik II

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baka! *hides the crack pipe* it wasnt my fault. the cat was typing fpr me :meh:


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Sure, sure, blame it on Ditto...Poor cat was prob'ly asleep.

I was really glad to find out that

Sheemie
didn't just up and disappear. I kinda expected that it was him by how Eddie said he was watching Roland.

Looking forward to the end...Just so I can read it all again!!!


"There's no such thing as can't. You always have a choice."--Ken Gor, Ying hung boon sik II

[sIGPIC]Dattebayo!!![/sIGPIC]

Thank you to everyone who has ever made me sigs, you are all wonderful!

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mmmmmmmmmmmmmm :(

Lemme know when you finish that dangerous novel


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OFFICIAL! STEPHEN KING AND MARVEL BRING "THE DARK TOWER" TO COMICS

by Jonah Weiland, Executive Producer

Posted: October 28, 2005 Official Press Release

New Comic Series Exploring the Origin of the Notorious Gunslinger Character Marks First Time Stephen King Has Produced Original Content for the Comic Book Format

Marvel Comics to Launch First Issue in April 2006

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NEW YORK - World Fantasy Award-winning writer Stephen King, long acknowledged as the master of modern horror, and Marvel Comics join forces this spring to launch a ground-breaking new comic book series adapted from King's magnum opus, The Dark Tower. The first issue is scheduled to debut in April 2006.

The comic series will mark the first time Stephen King has produced original content for an ongoing comic book project. The series will expand the saga of King's epic hero, Roland Deschain, whose quest to save the Dark Tower is captured in seven best-selling novels published over the course of twenty-five years. King's unparalleled storytelling power will inform new stories that delve into the life and times of the young Roland, revealing the trials and conflicts that lead to the burden of destiny he must assume as a man, the last Gunslinger from a world that has moved on. The comics will work in conjunction with the novels, further supplementing and defining the saga's mythology under the direction of the acclaimed author himself.

"As a lifelong fan of Marvel comic books, and as an adult reader who's seen comics "come of age" and take their rightful place in the world of fantasy and science fiction, I'm excited to be a part of Roland's new incarnation," said Stephen King.

The series will be illustrated by Eisner-award winning artist Jae Lee.

King continued, "I love Jae Lee's work, and I think this is going to be a dynamite partnership. Frankly, I can't wait."

"Stephen King is a true literary master. We are thrilled beyond words to have him join Marvel on this exciting project. The millions of Dark Tower fans are in for a real treat, and I'm sure many more will soon be hooked on this epic series through this historic comic project," said Joe Quesada, Marvel Entertainment's Editor-In-Chief and Chief Creative Officer, Publishing.

"The level of excitement and talent that Stephen King brings to the world of comic books is electrifying. We're proud and honored to be a part of what promises to be an industry-defining event," said Dan Buckley, Publisher and Chief Operating Officer of Marvel Entertainment, Publishing.

DarkTower_p01_col2_sm.jpg DarkTower_p02_col2_sm.jpg DarkTower_p0304_col2_sm.jpg

Pocket Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, will be releasing the last three novels in the Dark Tower series (Wolves of the Calla, Song of Susannah, and The Dark Tower) in 2006. Available in paperback from Scribner is a two-volume concordance to the novels compiled by Robin Furth, who is also contributing to the Marvel comic project. Two new Stephen King novels will be published by Scribner in 2006-CELL (with a protagonist who just happens to be a comic book artist) in January, and LISEY'S STORY in October. Having written over 40 novels, Stephen King is one of the most popular writers of all time, and is undoubtedly the world's leading horror writer. His books have been translated into 33 languages and published in over 35 countries. Currently, more than 300 million copies of his novels are in print.

Watch for more art and info as it becomes available at www.marvel.com/king

http://www.comicbookresources.com/news/newsitem.cgi?id=6113


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Ya! Roland kinda looks like Gutts in that last pic ;)


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