Strider Hiryu

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About Strider Hiryu

  • Rank
    Resident Browncoat
  • Birthday 10/18/1985

Public / Shared Information

  • Biography
    Ask and I might tell
  • Location
    The Frozen North
  • Interests
    Philosophy, Poetry, Gaming, Reading, and Anime
  • Occupation
    Freelance Programmer/Artist, Philosopher, Gundam Expert, Depressed Homicidal Maniac?
  • Favorite Anime
    Dirty Pair, Zeta Gundam
  • Favorite Game
    Ace Combat 6
  • Favorite Movie
    Donnie Darko
  • Favorite Book
    The Antichrist
  • Currently Watching
    Very little atm
  • Currently Playing
    STO, FFXIV: ARR
  • Currently Reading
    Spice and Wolf, SOA

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  1. While I have yet to watch BvS all the way through (I skipped around just to see if it was as bad as many have said it is, I'll probably end up watching it all the way through this weekend) Affleck has my full endorsement to continue to play Batman until he's sick of it (not like my endorsement means much). His portrayal is by far the best one I've seen since Michael Keaton (I liked Christian Bale's portrayal but Affleck is just so much better) and I can't wait until they finally film and release the new Batman standalone film, it's going to be epic (and Affleck is directing it).

    1. DeathscytheX

      DeathscytheX

      The movie wasn't as bad as everyone made it out to be. I saw an article today saying it was the lack of humor that gave the preception. Maybe so... but sometimes hero flicks get too carried away with humor like it's a Deadpool flick before Deadpool ever came out in which it worked perfect in. It was very serious and dark, and i guess thats a turn off to the masses. I remember reading that the original ending to Interstellar was Cooper going into the black hole and you didn't know if he ever made it back. It scored poorly within focus groups so they changed it.

      This is off subject kinda, but I miss those types of films that take a bold chance like the end of Inception or the end of John Carpenter's The Thing (the 1982 one). Most moves are full of predictable tropes and clichés, but if you venture out of that zone, critics rip you apart. 

    2. Strider Hiryu

      Strider Hiryu

      From what little I gathered in my skipping about the movie actually does look good but I'll post my fully detailed thoughts on it once I actually watch it all the way through (though I will state I don't like Eisenberg as Luthor, that was a complete miscast in my opinion). I actually prefer serious and movies, even more so with heroes. I've never been a really big fan of superheroes because I never grew up reading comics and I rarely watched the cartoons (my superheroes as a child were the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Power Rangers (yea, I was a huge PR fan), and the Transformers) but what little I've gathered there wasn't a lot of humor in the comics and I'm happy this is the first real film to approach that aspect. The humor in Deadpool worked because it's Deadpool, an anti-hero that doesn't even take himself seriously. The humor also works in the Avengers because, while everything going on is generally serious, the timing of the jokes is just so well done to help break the tension.

      I loved the ending to The Thing, that's one of my all time favorite movies. I wish more movies took chances like it did (I haven't seen Inception so I can't really comment on it but I do know how it ends and I think, given the whole premise of the movie, that was a perfect way to end it). Critics these days want to be entertained and not given a whole hell of a lot to think about, they want Michael Bay and JJ films (lots of explosions, lens flare, etc). Very rarely does a completely original film or a film that takes massive chances well received. I mean look at Chappie, it got shit reviews but I absolutely loved the movie. While it's not a completely original idea and sure the film has quite a few shortcomings but it's honestly one of the best movies I saw last year (and I didn't see it till I bought it and on BD none-the-less) because I actually liked the idea they were presenting and I loved watching Chappie grow throughout the film, going from being an infant to an adult persay (and it's a good look into how self-aware AI will most likely evolve when we reach that state). On the reverse of that look at Star Wars: The Force Awakens. The film took very little in the way of chances and recycled most of the plot from A New Hope yet it still receives critical appraise. Don't get me wrong it was a good movie but it took the safe route and mostly did well on it's name alone. This is why Hollywood is dying and they're too stupid to see it (it's also the reason why the Game Industry has been severely lacking in quality games over the years (and why it's slowly imploding in on itself) but that's for another discussion), completely original ideas and risk taking is frowned upon and no one dares take the chance to step out of the safe zone.

    3. Sledgstone

      Sledgstone

      I hated Eisenberg as Luthor. He was completely wrong for the role. It was like he was trying to be Heath Ledgers joker instead an extremely intelligent evil businessman. Idris Elba would have been a great Luthor. And the creation of Doomsday was horrible. They could have just made him come crashing into the atmosphere on an asteroid like in the comic and it would have worked much better.